Q&A Forum

29/1/19

Gillian

My husband and I are thinking of transitioning our 8.5 month old daughter to her own room but are nervous about SIDS risk. We would continue to follow all other safe sleeping guidelines - sleeping bag, nothing else in cot and we'd have a monitor set up in our room. We have read the red nose information and understand that you advise room sharing with baby for 6-12 months but I'm unclear what the issues would be after 6 months, given that after we put her to sleep on her back our daughter now chooses to roll over to sleep on her tummy, she's rolling and crawling, and there are no other objects/blankets/etc in her cot. The only issue we are having is she pulls herself up to standing regularly and sometimes bangs her head on the cot so we have to rush in - we have lowered her cot to the bottom level so she can't get out and understand bumpers aren't recommended - so any other tips would be greatly appreciated. Are you able to shed any light on any further risks of moving baby into her own room at 8.5 months given the above information?

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Posted a response on 31/1/19

Red Nose

Hi Gillian,

Red Nose does recommend room sharing for 6-12 months. However, most families seem to move baby to their own room after 6 months.

Room sharing is predominantly an issue of supervision/checking of baby, however the risk of sudden infant death is low after 6 months of age.

Parents are not expected to observe baby constantly.

If baby is sleeping in a separate room check baby regularly to ensure that the baby remains on the back and the head and face remain uncovered (as baby grows beyond 5-6 months they will move around the cot and roll over; settle baby to sleep on their back but let them find the sleep position they feel most comfortable in. A safe cot and safe sleep environment is still necessary for older babies).

https://rednose.com.au/article/roomsharing

As babies grow and develop they become very active and learn to roll around the cot. At this time, continue to put them on the back at the start of sleep time, but let them find their own position of comfort. By this stage it is not necessary to wake during the night to turn baby over to the back position.

The risk of sudden infant death in babies over six months is extremely low

https://rednose.com.au/article/what-do-we-do-now-that-a-baby-has-started-to-roll-over

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